REO Speedwagon – Keep On Loving You

First Hit #1: March 21, 1981

I have to admit to a certain love of power ballads. They can be cheesy, granted, but that’s the beauty of them. They’re big songs with big choruses that are great fun to sing along to. Some people say they enjoy them ironically, but they’re all lying, they don’t work that well if you’re not just abandoning your inhibitions and just going with it. That’s when the songs become fun, because it’s a moment of shared joy, as everyone dives in and just goes for it, embracing the full-bodied expression that the songs tend to use.

So, REO Speedwagon, which is named after an old timey firetruck, has one of the all time power ballad classics in Keep On Loving You. It’s the chorus that’s the star here, the full-bodied expression of love that dominates the song and makes one forget the rest of it exists. For whatever reason I thought it went directly from “Should have seen the look in your eyes,” to the big chorus. But no! it takes its time, even going so far as to trick you into thinking it’s going to launch into the part everyone sings along to. It takes an entire minute to get there, which doesn’t seem like very long, but it actually kind of feels drawn out. Then again, they don’t waste time for the rest of the song, doubling down on that chorus and inspiring many intoxicated people around the world to sing about continuing to love someone. It’s a bit cheesy, so what, it’s pop music. More importantly, it’s very fun.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in 1981 and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to REO Speedwagon – Keep On Loving You

  1. Robert Berman says:

    I love the snake rattle after the “coiled up and hissing” line at the end of the first verse. This isn’t the only one of their songs with this unusual structure of two verses, chorus, instrumental, chorus, out. “Time For Me To Fly” does the same, for instance. A well-written verse isn’t just killing time for the chorus to come around again, and these guys know how to write a verse. The song topic is interesting, apparently about a man who gets mad but ultimately forgives his woman despite a string of infidelities on her part. I always wonder if those songs are written with reversed genders of what actually happened, which seems like a far more likely scenario for a travelling musician.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s